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Court-Ordered Rehab

Court-Ordered Rehab

Addiction to drugs and alcohol affects all areas of your life. The addiction can lead to poor decision-making, which may include things you would never do sober, such as committing crimes. In some cases, a judge sentences an offender to mandatory addiction treatment instead of jail time, but this type of sentence is not a “get-out-of-jail free” card. Court-ordered rehab comes with a set of eligibility requirements and requires successful completion to satisfy sentencing in the case. Basics of Court-Ordered Rehab  The goal of court-ordered rehab is to rehabilitate an individual who is addicted to drugs or alcohol to prevent additional crimes in the future. Rehab takes the place of some or all of the jail time or other punishments the individual might otherwise have to serve for committing the crime. Judges, lawyers, law enforcement personnel and other members of the criminal justice system understand that not all offenders are a threat to society and not everyone needs jail time. While the individual does need help to deal with the alcohol or drug addiction, there is a chance for that person to recover and lead a life that doesn’t involve criminal activity. The offender must complete the treatment program as specified by the court in order to avoid the jail time, fines and other potential punishments. The treatment itself is similar to any drug or alcohol addiction treatment, but the individual may have additional requirements, such as drug tests. In some cases, the rehab simply decreases the punishment instead of avoiding it completely. You may still have to pay restitution, for example. You may have a period of probation... Read more
Alcohol and Anxiety: A Dangerous Comorbidity

Alcohol and Anxiety: A Dangerous Comorbidity

If you have turned to alcohol as a means of relieving stress, you are certainly not alone. One study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry found that 13% of American adults surveyed reported drinking alcohol to moderate feelings of anxiety, stress or panic at least once in the previous year. The researchers also found individuals with confirmed anxiety disorders who reported self-medicating at the start of the investigation period were 2 to 5 times more likely to develop a substance problem within 3 years when compared with their counterparts who did not self-medicate. Alcohol acts as both a sedative and a depressant, both of which help to take your mind off of anything that might be causing you stress. In this way, alcohol has certain effects that mirror anti-anxiety medications. The problem comes, however, when you drink to excess and eventually build a tolerance to the destressing elements of alcohol use. At this point, alcohol may become the biggest exacerbator for anxiety. The outcomes of this comorbidity are compelling. One meta-analysis published in the journal of Alcohol Research suggests comorbid alcohol abuse and anxiety come with significant societal costs. Alcohol use disorders (AUD) cost the United States an estimated $184.6 billion each year while anxiety disorders cost somewhere between $42 billion and $47 billion annually. It’s important for you to understand the relationship between AUDs and anxiety. In the event you feel you may have fallen into this situation, you know how to get help so you can get your life back on track. Prevalence of Alcohol Consumption in the United States According to the National Institute on... Read more
Can Addiction Ever Be Cured?

Can Addiction Ever Be Cured?

When you go to your doctor for an infection, you expect that you’ll be cured. You know you’ll receive antibiotics and be a little tired for a few days, but soon you’ll feel better and be back to your old self. In fact, eventually you’ll probably forget all about the time you were sick and you most likely won’t make any adjustments in your lifestyle because of it. But what about recovery from an addiction? Can you achieve the same level of healing? Can you leave a treatment facility and forget about what you’ve been through? Unfortunately, this scenario doesn’t work with addiction. Achieving a cure, in the pure sense of the word, is unlikely. You will have to work to maintain your new clean lifestyle and be aware of triggers that could cause you to relapse. But in many ways you will be stronger than before your recovery process began. You’ll feel better physically and mentally. And you will have the pride of knowing that you have overcome an enormous obstacle in your life! Is There a Cure for Addiction? The word “cure” implies the removal of a disease or a condition. If a doctor could pronounce you cured of addiction, you’d no doubt feel a great sense of relief and joy. The substance abuse or alcoholism would be completely behind you and you could return to social drinking and occasional drug use without consequence if you wanted. However, addiction isn’t something that’s so easily cured. Recovery isn’t the same as the traditional definition of cure. A person who has problems with addiction or substance abuse always needs... Read more
The Importance of Goal Setting in Recovery

The Importance of Goal Setting in Recovery

If you are using drugs and alcohol, you probably aren’t in a place in your life that you would describe as being a very happy one. When you go to a treatment facility to get healthy and stay healthy, your recovery will include setting some personal goals for yourself. Difference Between Dreams and Goals Are you sure you know the difference between dreams and goals? Dreams are thoughts of things you might like to have someday. While they’re certainly very pleasant, they don’t have any type of timeline attached to them. Dreams also don’t require anything from you. A dream doesn’t make you put forth any effort to achieve it. A goal is something that you want to accomplish in a tangible, measurable way. It has some type of time frame for completion, even if that time is months, or even several years, in the future. To achieve a goal, you’ll need to put in effort and do some work. Setting Goals for Yourself in Recovery Each person’s recovery is as individual as they’re. There is no “one size fits all” approach that works for everyone. That is as it should be. No one else has your unique background, history of use or reasons for using drugs or alcohol. It doesn’t make sense for your treatment program to look like anyone else’s. The goals you set for yourself during recovery will also be unique. The Benefits of Goals in Recovery They Require Self-examination In order to set goals for yourself in recovery, you must take the time to reflect on the things that are most important to you. How... Read more
Substance Abuse Outpatient Programs: Same Difference?

Substance Abuse Outpatient Programs: Same Difference?

Drug addiction is a serious, chronic brain disease characterized by an insatiable, compulsive need to seek drugs and abuse them, despite known consequences. Underlying the addiction are often co-occurring emotional or mental disorders. Thus, it is critical to know that mental health and substance abuse disorders do not vanish on their own without some form of intervention. The good news is that you do not have to suffer alone — a rehabilitation program can help you jumpstart your recovery. The problem of addiction is extremely pervasive. Between 2006 and 2010, excessive alcohol use led to approximately 88,000 deaths and 2.5 million years of potential life lost in the United States. On average, alcohol shortened the lives of these people by 30 years. Additionally, data reveal that excessive drinking was responsible for 10% of all deaths among working-age adults aged 20-64 years. With respect to drugs, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that 78 people die each day because of drugs, while thousands of others arrive at hospital emergency rooms for treatment. Approximately 10.2% of people age 12 and older reported using some form of illicit drug within the past month. The United States is undeniably in the midst of an opioid overdose epidemic. Opioids and heroin were responsible for more than 28,000 deaths in 2014 alone, more than any year on record. At least half of all opioid overdose deaths involve a prescription opioid. Meanwhile, the latest National Survey on Drug Use and Health administered by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMSHA) revealed that 8.5% of the United States population (22.5 million total people) aged 12 and older needed... Read more
Top Reasons People Use Drugs

Top Reasons People Use Drugs

Drug use is a dynamic issue that begins in different ways for different individuals. There are countless reasons why people begin to abuse drugs, whether they’re illicit drugs or prescription medications. The range of reasons why people take drugs is as broad as the types of people who use them. Drug addiction can affect anyone, of any background, and of any socio-economic status. Contrary to popular belief, drug use doesn’t solely fall under the category of mental illness, homelessness or even poor family upbringing. Educated individuals with high-paying jobs, families and seemingly perfect or sought-after lives can be vulnerable to drug abuse, as well. In general, there are three primary causes of drug use. Within these main causes, there stems a myriad of reasons as to why people start to use drugs. Certain people may face several different factors, which are each, on their own, a reason to use drugs. But these reasons are all the result of some sort of emotional, psychological or physical categorization of the causes for drug use. Emotional: Feeling they need drugs to fill a void in their lives (whether it’s stress, trauma, relationship issues or more) Physical: Feeling like they need the physical effects of a high or low to physically feel better Psychological: General feelings of inadequacy towards themselves or the world, so they use drugs to boost their confidence and self-esteem and ability to make sense of things Triggering and Common Causes of Drug Abuse While there are emotional, psychological and physical reasons why people may choose to abuse drugs in the first place, there are several triggers that fall within... Read more
The Impact of an Addicted Parent

The Impact of an Addicted Parent

  For many children around the world, the struggle of living with a parent who is addicted to drugs or alcohol is all too real. While it’s easy to ignore the problem if you aren’t directly affected by it, or even if you are the one in the throes of addiction, it doesn’t make it any less impactful. In fact, more than eight million children are currently living with an addicted parent. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License. According to sources cited from the infographic above, 25 percent of those living within the United States will have firsthand exposure to alcoholism before they turn 18 years of age. Moreover, of the 8.3 million children who are currently living with an addicted parent, approximately 12% are under the age of 18. Broken Families and Broken Homes As of 2012, addiction to drugs or alcohol made up over 30% of all cases involving the removal of children for placement in foster care services. These studies continued on to state that 19% of these children will participate in underage drinking, while 56% while dabble in recreational or street drugs. On top of all this, children who have one or more alcoholic parent are four times more likely to become an addict themselves. In fact, approximately 33% of alcoholics indicate the presence of an alcoholic parent when they were younger. Problems in School Rampant drug or alcohol abuse can even lead to problems with your children’s school life. Apart from giving them a reputation amongst their peers, studies indicated that 30% of these children will be... Read more
Importance of Support Groups in Recovery

Importance of Support Groups in Recovery

Most people have heard the term support group. Some may have belonged to various support groups, while others have never participated, but wonder exactly what they’re and what they do. Generally speaking, support groups exist when people get together to share their concerns about a particular issue. These types of groups mostly focus on particular health problems, such as types of addictions and diseases like multiple sclerosis, breast cancer or diabetes. Support groups differ from group therapy, in that group therapy assists those with similar mental health diagnoses, and participants gather under the supervision of a mental health professional. Anyone with an interest in gathering a group of people with concerns about a certain disease or condition can form a support group. Support groups can be led by laypersons or by professionals such as nurses or social workers. With today’s technology, support groups come in many different forms, such as internet or telephone as well as in person. While support groups are often gatherings of people talking about their experiences, they can also focus on education. For instance, an oncologist who specializes in the treatment of breast cancer may be the guest speaker at a support group for those with breast cancer. Benefits of Support Groups No matter what the type of support group, they allow people with similar concerns to gather to discuss their problems with one another. By sharing with one another, people are often able to give each other advice to help them cope with their problems. Some of the most apparent benefits of support groups are: Getting the opportunity to share your ideas about treatments... Read more
Differences Between Physical and Psychological Addiction

Differences Between Physical and Psychological Addiction

When you’re caught in the grip of addiction, it’s a very frightening and confusing place. You may feel bewildered, angry, scared and out of control. In fact, there are a whole host of emotions you may be experiencing. It’s true that when you’re struggling with addiction, it can be a very lonely experience — especially when you’re dealing with both physical and psychological issues. Substance abuse is complex by nature and physical and psychological addiction can often overlap, so you may not know one from the other. It is so important for you to be able to differentiate between the two before you enter a drug rehab program. The first step to getting clean is realizing — and admitting — that you have a substance abuse problem. The next step is identifying, either on your own or through the help of a rehab center, such as JourneyPure Emerald Coast, whether your addiction is a physical or psychological one. Here, we will look at the differences between physical and psychological addiction in detail, so you know what you’re dealing with, and how best to tackle it. It is important to know that while we will separate physical and psychological addiction into sections to help explain each, the two types of addiction can and do overlap. What is Addiction? Before splitting addition out into physical and psychological addiction, it is helpful to understand what addiction is as an umbrella term. When people talk about addiction, it means the continued use of a substance that alters a person’s mood in spite of negative consequences/behaviors. To understand what addiction is, you need to... Read more
Depression & Addiction – Relationship and Proper Treatment

Depression & Addiction – Relationship and Proper Treatment

In some ways, depression and addiction are part of what it means to be human. They are extensions — or perhaps more accurately, abominations — of why you care about life. You desire to be significant and important in someone’s eyes, or in just your own. This desire drives you to act nobly toward yourself and fellow humans, but it can also fuel the frustration of feeling inadequate and hopeless. It can be like drinking salt water when stranded on a boat — it makes the thirst only hurt more. Addiction is the simple, but incorrect, solution to your problems. It’s not an answer because it’s just a Band-Aid. Without replacing the Band-Aid and cleaning the wound, even the Band-Aid becomes infected. The connection between depression and substance abuse is complicated, but there clearly is a relationship. Treating these two disorders requires the right team of professionals who have the right expertise to see the subtle clues that lead to successful recovery. Treatment can take on different forms, including combinations of both medication and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). There is no one-size-fits-all approach to treating depression and addiction. Chances of recovery are best when a team of trained professionals are in your corner, guiding you each step of the way. There are medications for depression and medications for addiction. There are psychotherapy techniques that work against depression, and those that work against addiction. Each person’s journey is unique. Success against depression and addiction requires compassion, expert knowledge, patience and reassurance. Why Depressed People Are More Prone to Addiction  The ancient Greek author Homer wrote of humans that, “Of all... Read more